What Language Do They Speak In Switzerland

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At the national level, German, French and Italian operate as official languages ​​of equal status within the Confederation of the Swiss Confederation, while the Romanian language is used in communication with the people who speak it.

What Language Do They Speak In Switzerland

What Language Do They Speak In Switzerland

In 2020, 62.3% of Switzerland’s population is native German (either German or Standard German). 22.8% Frch (mostly Swiss French, but also some Franco-provçal); 8% Italian (mostly Swiss Italian, but also Lombard); and 0.5% Roman.

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German region (Deutschschweiz) around East, North and West; the French part (la Romandie) in the west; and the territory of Italy (Svizzera italiana) in the south. A small native Romanian-speaking population remains in the Eastern Grisons. The cantons of Fribourg, Bern and Valais are officially bilingual; The Grisons are three official languages.

In 2012, it happened for the first time that respondents indicated more than one language, so the percentage exceeded 100%.

The German-speaking part of Switzerland (German Deutschschweiz, frch: Suisse alémanique, Italian: Svizzera tedesca, Romanian: Svizra tudestga) covers about 65% of Switzerland (Northwestern Switzerland, Eastern Switzerland, Ctral Switzerland, most of Switzerland. Most of the Alps).

German is the official language of the Swiss cantons (Aargau, Appzell Ausserrhod, Appzell Innerrhod, Basel-Stadt, Basel-Landschaft, Glarus, Luzern, Nidwald, Obwald, Schaffhaus, Schwyz, Solothurn, Thurgau, Gall. Zuri, Zug and. ).

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In the cantons of Bern, Fribourg, and Valais, Frch is the co-official; Of the three languages ​​of Graubünd, more than half of the population speaks German, while the rest speak Romanian or Italian. In all cases, each language is the official language of the relevant canton.

While the French-speaking Swiss prefer to refer to themselves as Romans and their country as Romandia, the German-speaking Swiss refer to the French-speaking Swiss as “Welsche” (and still use the term today). Their territory is Welschland, which has the same denomination as the Welsh language (see Walha).

In Germany, Welsch and Welschland refer to Italy; There, the term is outdated, rarely used, and somewhat slanderous.

What Language Do They Speak In Switzerland

However, in 2017, 11.1% of Swiss residents, or about 920,600, spoke Standard German (“Hochdeutsch”) at home, but this statistic may be mainly attributed to Germans (and Austrians).

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The geography of language in Switzerland in XX. At the beginning of the century. Page from the school atlas, in the collection of the Swiss Jewish Museum.

In the German-speaking areas of Switzerland, a clear distinction was made in the Middle Ages between the rural cantons (Uri, Schwyz, Unterwald, Glarus, Zug, Appzell, Schaffhaus) and the urban cantons (Luzern, Bern, Zurich, Solothurn., Friborg, Basel, St. Gall), sharing views on trade and commerce. After the Reformation, all the authorities were either Catholic or Protestant, and the influence that Dominance in culture has made the difference bigger. Today, when all the cantons are clearly mixed, different historical possessions can be seen in the mountain villages, where Roman Ctral Switzerland is rich in churches and statues of saints, and farmhouses in the similar landscape of the Protestant Bernese Oberland. Instead, he carved scriptures on the front of the house.

Alongside this broader notion of Swiss German is Walser German, another High Alemannic word brought by Walser immigrants from Valais.

Since most of Switzerland is German-speaking, many French, Italian, and Romanian speakers have moved to Switzerland, and non-German-speaking Swiss children born in the rest of Switzerland speak German.

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Italian: Svizzera romanda) French-speaking part of Switzerland. It covers the territory of the cantons of Geva, Vaud, Neuchâtel and Jura, as well as the French-speaking part of the cantons of Bern (mostly German-speaking), Valais (mostly French-speaking) and Friborg (mostly French-speaking. ). most). 1.9 million people (or 24.4% of the Swiss population) live in Romandie.

The standard Swiss Franc and the French Franc are mutually exclusive, although there are differences. For example, like most francophone Belgians, Swiss French speakers use septante (sevty) instead of soixante-dix (literally: “sixty t”) and nonante (ninety) instead of “quatre-vingt-dix” (instead of “four twenty t.”). ). In the cantons of Vaud, Valais and Fribourg, speakers use huitante (eighty) instead of “quatre-vingts” (four twenty) used in the rest of the French-speaking region; The cantons of Geva, Bern and Jura use “quatre-vingts”.

“Sou” is used in Romandia for the 5 ctime coin, as well as “tune” (or “thune”) for the 5 Swiss franc.

What Language Do They Speak In Switzerland

Historically, the native language spoken by the majority of the people of Romandia was Franco-Provçal. Franco-Provçal (also called Arpitan) is a language that is sometimes considered halfway between langue d’oïl (the historical language of northern France and the ancestors of Frch) and Occitan (language d’oc, the language of southern France). Standard Frch and Franco-Provçal/Arpitan are linguistically different and mutual understanding is limited. Franco-Provçal/Arpitan is used more by members of the older age group only.

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Local languages ​​are also spoken in parts of Jura Franc-Comtois; They belong to the same Oïl block as the standard Frch.

The word Romandia does not exist in the official political system, but is used to distinguish and unify the Swiss-speaking French population. The television channel Télévision Suisse Romande (TSR) serves the Romande community throughout Switzerland and around the world through the TV5Monde service.

Italian Switzerland (Italian: Svizzera italiana, Romanian: Svizra taliana, French: Suisse italine, German: italiische Schweiz) is the Italian-speaking part of Switzerland, which includes the canton of Ticino and southern Grisons. In Valais, Italian is still spoken in the Gondo Valley (which leads to the Simplon Pass, in the southern part of the river). The native language of the region is Lombard, more precisely its Ticino dialect.

The share of the population that speaks Italian has been decreasing since the 1970s, after reaching 12% of the population in the same decade. This is due to the decrease in the number of immigrants from Italy to Switzerland. However, it has increased again in the last decade.

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Romanian is the official language of the three Grisons, where municipalities are free to determine their own official languages. Since 1938, the Swiss Federal Constitution has recognized the Romanian language as one of the four “national languages”. In 1996, it was also declared an “official language” of the Commonwealth of Nations, meaning that Romanian speakers could use their language with the central government and expect to receive answers in Romanian. Although the Romansh language is divided into several dialects, the federal and cantonal authorities use only Standard version (Romansh Grischun).

In addition to the national language and the variety of Swiss German, several regional Romanian languages ​​are spoken in Switzerland: Franco-Provçal and Lombard.

While learning other national languages ​​at school is important, many Swiss today find it easier to use Glish as French with other Swiss with a different linguistic background.

What Language Do They Speak In Switzerland

Latin is used on Swiss franc coins (Helvetia or Confoederatio Helvetica) and Swiss stamps (Helvetia). The top-level domain for Switzerland’s country code on the Internet is .ch, an abbreviation of the Latin name Confoederatio Helvetica (Swiss Confederation); Similarly, the international registration code for Swiss cars is “CH”. The Federal Palace of Switzerland bears the inscription Curia Confoederationis Helveticae.

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In order to have a unique name throughout the country (not like German, French or other languages), many Swiss institutions and associations have Latin names, such as Pro Helvetia, Pro Infirmis, Pro Juvtute, Pro Natura, Pro Patria, Pro Sectute. , Pro Specie Rara, etc. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding links to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be objected to and removed. Find source: “German-speaking Switzerland” – News · Newspapers · Books · Scholar · JSTOR (June 2021) (Learn how and how to remove this template message)

The German-speaking part of Switzerland (German Deutschschweiz, frch: Suisse alémanique, Italian: Svizzera tedesca, Romanian: Svizra tudestga) includes about 65 percent of Switzerland (Northwestern Switzerland, Eastern Switzerland, Central Switzerland, Switzerland at large and most. Swiss Alps part).

The German language of Switzerland is called Swiss German, which refers to any Alemannic language, which is divided into low, high and high Alemannic. The only exception is the town of Samnaun within German-speaking Switzerland, where the Austro-Bavarian dialect is spoken.

German is the only official language in 17 Swiss dialects (Aargau, Appzell Ausserrhod, Appzell Innerrhod, Basel-Stadt, Basel-Landschaft, Glarus, Luzern, Nidwald, Obwald, Schaffhaus, Schwyz, Solothurn, Zurgau, St. Urgau,,, and Zurich).

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They are official in 3 cantons of France and Germany (Bern, Fribourg, and Valais). Of the three languages ​​of Graubünd, more than half of the population speaks German, while most of the rest speak the official languages, Romanian and Italian.

While the French-speaking Swiss prefer to refer to themselves as Romands and part of their country la Romandie, the German-speaking Swiss refer to the French-speaking Swiss as “Welsche” (and still do so today) and their names. An area like Welschland, which has the same ecology as Glish Welsh (see Walha). In Germany, Welsch and Welschland refer to Italy; There, the old word,